Meet WordPress coding standards on Sublime Text – SublimePhpTidy

I made the move from Coda to Sublime Text this week.

After only a week, I really, really like Sublime Text – it’s fast, pretty and customizable with a wide range of plugins available via the Package Manager.

Here are 9 reasons Sublime Text is only mighty!

I came across an old Coda plugin that I did some work on years ago that is now available on Sublime Text; the plugin helps to tidy and format your code to meet WordPress coding standards.

The plugin is available here – https://github.com/welovewordpress/SublimePhpTidy

It is pretty cool to see something you did a few years ago being picked up by someone else, improved upon and ported to a new editor that you happen to move to :).

WordPress Debug Log without Deprecated Notices

You turn on WordPress debugging only to find the log full of deprecated notices that make the log difficult to parse. Bummer.

You could spend time going through each deprecated notice and updating the offending piece of code. Or you could ask WordPress to ignore these deprecated notices (at least in the short term) by doing the following;
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How to debug your WordPress plugin

If you are developing a plugin on WordPress, you will need to debug your code as you go.

To enable debugging, go to your wp-config.php file.

Find the line…

define('WP_DEBUG', false);

Replace the line above with the following…

// Turns WordPress debugging on
define('WP_DEBUG', true);

// Tells WordPress to log everything to the /wp-content/debug.log file
define('WP_DEBUG_LOG', true);

// Doesn't force the PHP 'display_errors' variable to be on
define('WP_DEBUG_DISPLAY', false);

// Hides errors from being displayed on-screen
@ini_set('display_errors', 0);

Now you all warnings and errors will show up in the /wp-content/debug.log file, including WordPress warnings of deprecated functions.

You can write directly to this log from your plugin using the error_log() function.

Typically…

//output some debug string
error_log( 'this works yo' );

//output some array/object
error_log( print_r( $some_obj_or_array, 1 ) );

Kudos to this post. It has some good plugin development tips, including how to enable debugging on WordPress.

WP Plugins: How to remove a Filter

Do not use remove_filter(). It is possible it will break other hooks which can have unintended consequences. This post gives a really good alternative approach using static variables.

hakre on wordpress

Worth to know for wordpress plugin authors: Making your plugin to safely unregister or remove a hook (filter or action) is not possible with the wordpress plugin API. Why? you might ask yourself. Even the name of the remove_filter() function suggests it and the codex documentation does say so as well.

But: It does not work, because this function does not work as intended. And beyond your own hooks, it has the potential to hinder the blog from working properly as it has the potential to remove other hooks then the specified one.

Does not is not exactly right, it does, but only sometimes. That’s specifically a bummer if you write plugins yourself, because you can not safely rely on it. For example, if running your plugin makes use of PHP 5.2 or greater it works. But it does not if it’s running on PHP 4 or PHP 5 lower…

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How to Auto-Forward Gmail Messages in Bulk

Unfortunately, Gmail will not allow you to forward old email via a filter.

gmailI found a way that you can transfer all email from one Gmail account to another, and it works but it’s a tad complicated.

If you want to simply forward old email, the solution from Digital Inspiration using Google Docs is better.
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